Category Archives: Fish

Barred Sand Bass

Barred Sand Bass_1

He dreams of her, larger than life, the time they spent together, days trickling by.

Awakening, he wonders if she knows how much she’s missing, how much she’s lost.

Fully awake, memory returns. He remembers the love, but he also remembers the other things.

He remembers the pushing, the shoving, the intensity of love turned dark and violent. In that moment, he knows what they lost but also what that loss gained. He knows that she made the right decision – the right decision for her, but also for him, for them.

He has to let the past go. He had to look forward and figure out how to live his life, past the point of rescue.

Coelacanth

Coelacanth

As a general rule, I don’t like to post photos of dead things, but since I am unlikely to ever see a living coelecanth, here you go.

This is one of the last recently-living remnants of the lobe-finned fish from which some scientists no longer believe that land mammals evolved, though Wikipedia has not been updated to match the debate about the sarcopterygians, the details of which I am only slightly aware.

Long story short: all* the scientists seem to agree that land animals evolved from fish, but perhaps not fish that looked like this one.

* Within a standard deviation or three.

Largescale Foureyes

Largescale Foureyes_6

Foureye fish can survive on land, if they find themselves stranded at low tide.

Not weird enough for you?

Foureye fish only have two eyes, but each eye is split into two parts, with each part having its own pupil and retina. This allows them to see above and below the water at the same time.

Not weird enough for you?

Foureye fish are “one side maters”, meaning that right-“handed” males only mate with left-“handed” females and vice versa.

Blind Cavefish

Blind Cavefish_3

According to Damian Moran, Rowan Softley and Eric J. Warrant, the blind cavefish lost its eyes because the visual part of the brain consumes 15% of all the energy used by the fish. So it’s less that they lost their eyes because they didn’t need them in the dark. It’s that, in the dark, there’s less total energy to go around so energy-expensive systems are selected against, as the most efficient fish win the energy game.

Read more at http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/1/8/e1500363.full